AKAMİB Başkanı Onur Kılıçer

AKAMİB Başkanı Onur Kılıçer

Turkey's furniture, paper, and forest products exports increased by 12.8% in quantity in April compared to the same period last year, reaching $586 million, despite a 6.5% decrease in value.

Turkey’s furniture, paper, and forest products exports increased by 12.8% in quantity in April compared to the same period last year, reaching $586 million, despite a 6.5% decrease in value.

Onur Kılıçer, President of AKAMİB, stated that although demand in the sector has increased, the same performance has not been achieved in terms of value due to the loss of price competitiveness. He emphasized the need for the exchange rate to rise in line with inflation to control cost systems and support an increase in exports’ value.

Turkey’s overall exports in April grew by 0.1% to $19.3 billion, limited by the impact of the holiday season. Furniture, paper, and forest products exports for the month decreased by 6.5% to $586 million compared to the same period in 2023. AKAMİB’s exports in April also fell by 14.7% to $58.198 million.

While the top three export destinations remained unchanged from January to April, exports to the USA increased by 90% in quantity and 37% in value during this period.

Iraq was the most successful market for the sector’s exports in April, with exports to the country reaching $76.4 million. Notable export growth rates were recorded for Georgia at 30.4% and the USA at 21.8%. In the January-April period, Iraq, Germany, and France stood out as the top export destinations, with a 102% increase in quantity and a 58% increase in value for exports to Iraq.

President Onur Kılıçer evaluated the sector’s April exports, stating: “Although we achieved a 12.8% increase in quantity in April exports, we experienced a 6.5% decrease in value. This indicates a significant increase in demand for our exports. However, we are unable to convert this into value. The main reason for this is the loss of our price competitiveness. We are forced to offer competitive prices to compete with our rivals. Despite rising input costs, the exchange rate not increasing at the same rate has put our sector companies in a difficult position. While we are pleased with the strong demand for the future, we also expect the exchange rate to increase in line with inflation to control our cost system and support an increase in the value of our exports.”